What are Cookies in internet terms?

cookie basket
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Question by Simon D: What are Cookies in internet terms?
not the food, the internet cookies!

Best answer:

Answer by naveen
Cookies are messages that web servers pass to your web browser when you visit Internet sites. Your browser stores each message in a small file, called cookie.txt. When you request another page from the server, your browser sends the cookie back to the server. These files typically contain information about your visit to the web page, as well as any information you’ve volunteered, such as your name and interests.

The term “cookie” is an allusion to a Unix program called Fortune Cookie that produces a different message, or fortune, each time it runs.

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  1. mike H says:

    when you visit a website a cookie is downloaded to your computer, this is then used to see if the computer comes back as each cookie is unique, this is generally used by website admins to track stats such as visitors returning against new ones or if you went to a site placed some thing in a shopping basket, let the site it could then keep the basket ready for you if you return.

  2. ੴΡουμάνα ઇઉ says:

    In computing, a cookie (also browser cookie, computer cookie, tracking cookie, web cookie, internet cookie, and HTTP cookie) is a small string of text stored on a user’s computer by a web browser. A cookie consists of one or more name-value pairs containing bits of information such as user preferences, shopping cart contents, the identifier for a server-based session, or other data used by websites.
    It is sent as an HTTP header by a web server to a web client (usually a browser) and then sent back unchanged by client each time it accesses that server. A cookie can be used for authenticating, session tracking (state maintenance), and maintaining specific information about users, such as site preferences or the contents of their electronic shopping carts. The term “cookie” is derived from “magic cookie”, a well-known concept in UNIX computing which inspired both the idea and the name of browser cookies. Some alternatives to cookies exist, each has its own uses, advantages, and drawbacks.
    Cookies are subject to a number of misconceptions, mostly based on the erroneous notion that they are computer programs that run on a user’s computer. In fact, cookies are simple pieces of text data that affect the operation of a web server, not the client, and do so in very specific ways. In particular, they are neither spyware nor viruses, although cookies from certain sites are described as spyware by many anti-spyware products because they can allow users to be tracked when they visit various sites.
    Most modern browsers allow users to decide whether to accept cookies, and the time frame to keep them, but rejecting cookies makes some websites unusable. For example, shopping carts or login systems implemented using cookies do not work if cookies are disabled. History

    The term “cookie” derives from “magic cookie”, which is a packet of data a program receives and sends out again unchanged. Magic cookies were already used in computing when Lou Montulli had the idea of using them in Web communications in June 1994.At the time, he was an employee of Netscape Communications, which was developing an e-commerce application for a customer. Cookies provided a solution to the problem of reliably implementing a virtual shopping cart.
    Together with John Giannandrea, Montulli wrote the initial Netscape cookie specification the same year. Version 0.9beta of Mosaic Netscape, released on October 13, 1994,supported cookies. The first actual use of cookies (out of the labs) was made for checking whether visitors to the Netscape Web site had already visited the site. Montulli applied for a patent for the cookie technology in 1995, and US patent 5774670 was granted in 1998. Support for cookies was integrated in Internet Explorer in version 2, released in October 1995.
    The introduction of cookies was not widely known to the public, at the time. In particular, cookies were accepted by default, and users were not notified of the presence of cookies. Some people were aware of the existence of cookies as early as the first quarter of 1995, but the general public learned about them after the Financial Times published an article about them on February 12, 1996. In the same year, cookies received lot of media attention, especially because of potential privacy implications. Cookies were discussed in two U.S. Federal Trade Commission hearings in 1996 and 1997.
    The development of the formal cookie specifications was already ongoing. In particular, the first discussions about a formal specification started in April 1995 on the www-talk mailing list. A special working group within the IETF was formed. Two alternative proposals for introducing state in HTTP transactions had been proposed by Brian Behlendorf and David Kristol, respectively, but the group, headed by Kristol himself, soon decided to use the Netscape specification as a starting point. On February 1996, the working group identified third-party cookies as a considerable privacy threat. The specification produced by the group was eventually published as RFC 2109 in February 1997. It specifies that third-party cookies were either not allowed at all, or at least not enabled by default.
    At this time, advertising companies were already using third-party cookies. The recommendation about third-party cookies of RFC 2109 was not followed by Netscape and Internet Explorer. RFC 2109 was followed by RFC 2965 in October 2000.

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